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Being independent is something that as a parent we strive for our children to achieve. Yet if we look at it truthfully, we are never really and truly independent. We may have left home, got jobs, got married, had children and so on, YET, we still go to our parents and our extended family for advice, for support, to share success and disappointments. When we begin to make the moves toward independence, when we start to watch our  children make these moves, we and they court opinion. We seek information, we research options and we trust we have done enough.

If we have truly left our parents then we rely on our friends for support, I wonder who Scotland’s friends are and how helpful they will be if Scotland goes it alone. Friends are often very vocal in a decision making process and then fade into the ether when the decision is made.

Today people will vote on the question “Should Scotland be an independent country” This is potentially most important decision they will ever have to make.
Whatever the result, the effects and ramifications will be wide ranging, far reaching, long term. They will affect millions of people who have had no say in the same decision.

I am talking about the English, Irish and Welsh populations, and the Scottish peoples who no longer reside in the Country. The members of the Armed Forces who are Scottish and yet cannot vote if they happen to be stationed abroad.

I do not pretend to understand the political, the financial, the defence arguments. Despite the wide-spread coverage in England, we have not received all the information, after all, there is no need, we cannot vote. We have only heard snippets. However, in my research, I have come across articles stating that there are still unanswered questions, parts of the argument that have not been aired.

I do not know when this talk of Independence began, I saw an article yesterday which pinned it at Tony Blair’s door. I suspect that it has been longer than that.
I know that when Wales and Scotland were given devolved powers that I had a sense of unease and a “where will it all end”  feeling.

I don’t understand how all this will affect the rest of the United Kingdom, I worry about how it will affect my children and their children.

I know I feel unhappy that a part of the Country I have lived in all my life want to go it alone. It feels like a child wanting to leave home.

I am unhappy that I don’t get to have a say (hence this blog), I am unhappy that Scottish MPs will continue to be able to have a vote on matters affecting me until the next General Election.

I am unhappy that the Leaders of the Political Parties have all promised more money and more powers to Scotland in an attempt to influence the vote. It feels like a parent trying to buy good behaviour.

I am unhappy that no matter what happens in the vote today, at least half the country of Scotland will be unhappy with the result. That they will have to live with the result they didn’t want – forever.  I hope their friends stand by them.

Being independent is something that as a parent we strive for our children to achieve. Yet if we look at it truthfully, we are never really and truly independent. We may have left home, got jobs, got married, had children and so on, YET, we still go to our parents and our extended family for advice, for support, to share success and disappointments. If we have truly left our parents then we rely on our friends for support, I wonder who Scotland’s friends are and how helpful they will be if Scotland goes it alone. Friends are often very vocal in a decision making process and then fade into the ether when the decision is made.

I, personally, hope there is a No vote. I hope that Scotland stays part of the United Kingdom and that as a family of Countries we can move on and mark a new chapter in our family history.  If there is a Yes vote, then I hope that this newly independent country finds that all is as they thought it would be, and that they haven’t been given false information by people seeking to sway them to their side.

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